Welcome authors, producers, dreamers, and all interested in children’s television production! 

I produce live action educational content for FULLY FUNDED projects that have already been pitched, developed, and are on their way to a TV or other screen near you.

I DO NOT have any experience developing shows, but so many people contact me regarding developing and pitching shows — again, not my area — I set up this page to clarify my work, share what I can help with, and offer a few resources links.

How I Can Help

If you are developing a project that includes live action STEM / STEAM activities for young children (pre-K through age 9) and are seeking training or other project support,  I have 16+ years of hands on experience designing, testing, and running activities for nationally syndicated Emmy Award children’s television shows.

Since 2002  I’ve worked on the production of nationally syndicated children’s television and web based programs.  This has been primarily on projects produced for PBS Kids by WGBH and Universal Studios.

For all the projects I work on, I am the production educator just off camera working with the children being filmed.

If you are interested in learning from this experience,  I offer presentations and Q&A sessions via Zoom for classes, project teams, and individuals, as well as on-site sessions in the greater Boston area.  To schedule a session, contact me and I can rates and scheduling link.

Pitching Shows — Not My Department

As I noted at the top, I DO NOT work on the development of new shows.  Everything I work on is already 100% fully funded.  I have no experience in the area of going from idea to funded and now your show is on TV and you’re a rich and famous kids media mogul.

On Pitching Shows

If you’re looking for help with the pitching and development of new shows, read on!  Here are a few notes and resources for you.

What should you do next?

Given that you can’t pitch your show to me,  what should you do?  Critical is your understanding how ideas are protected and understanding how show concepts are documented and shared within the industry.   Below are some resources you may find helpful.

Protecting Your Idea

You need to protect your ideas.  Until you get your amazing concepts (ideas) down in text, documented and registered anyone can take them. You can’t copyright raw ideas that are nothing more than flickering impulses in that beauty of a brain of yours.  You have to create something concrete from the idea  – a treatment, a script, a character – and register it appropriately.  Don’t ask me how, I’m not a lawyer or in the development business.

Do I have recommended resources on this?  Yes.  I found the book The Writer Got Screwed (But Didn’t Have To) : A Guide to the Legal and Business Practices of Writing for the Entertainment Industry (affiliate link) a very helpful orientation.

If you have an amazing concept you’d like to be made into a TV show, it’s a great idea to document it in the form of a Bible.  Not THE BIBLE, but a television SHOW BIBLE.

What’s a TV Show / Series Bible?

In the world of television a Bible is a document describing the Universe of a television show.  It outlines the premise, the format, describes the characters, primary locations, and the kind of adventures the characters have.   Now you may not need to have this to pitch a show, but it certainly can help organize your ideas, further the development of the project, and communicate to those in the industry that you’re serious.

Did you hear that?  Having a Bible communicates that you’re serious, have done your homework, and possibly are worth talking to.

As far as I’m concerned, if you aren’t willing to take the time to construct a Bible for your show, you don’t care enough to be making a show.  Or maybe you are an idea person and need to partner with someone who can write and move things along.

Either way, not much is going to happen if you can’t write your idea in a way that it can be protected, pitched and ultimately produced!

Sample TV Show Bibles

So how do you get started with writing your show’s Bible?  Well, you should get your hands on some samples.

Unfortunately these are hard to come by, especially online.  None of the show Bibles for the projects I work on are available online and I don’t have permission to share them.

Have no fear!

There is a great sample show Bible in Jeffrey Scott’s book  How to Write for Animation.   Even if your show is live action, puppet based, etc… the content is still worth reviewing.

There are also some websites with small collections of Bibles, though not many for children’s television.  See resource links below. Unfortunately I do not have sample Bibles I can share with you.

Additional Resources

That’s all folks!

6 Replies to “On Pitching TV Shows”

  1. This is extremely helpful. Thanks for posting.
    I’m planning to pitch an idea for a short (one or two minute) how-to series that would air between preschool children’s full-length programs (like the Dan Zanes music videos did a few years ago.) How many projects would you recommend I include in my Bible? It will be based on my website and app, which contain more projects than I could possibly pitch, so I’m assuming I’d just choose the best and most visually appealing of those experiments. Would you recommend I include links to my own videos and TV spots, or hire a professional to shoot unique videos of a specific length to pitch to potential sponsors and producers?
    My project seems very different from most of the Bibles I saw in your links, so I’m a little unsure about how to proceed.

  2. I was just researching how to pitch a pilot and came across your post here. This was helpful, especially since I was lucky enough to have this book in the university library. I’m going to check it out now.

  3. Sooo when can I set up a meeting for me to pitch my idea for a show to you again? By the way, this was very helpful. ;P

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